OnTap Magazine

RECIPE RED ALERT IRISH RED Nuts & bolts Batch size: 23 litres Target OG: 1.049 Target FG: 1.012 Target ABV: 4.8% Target IBUs: 30 ................................................................................................. Water Add the following to your water (I use water from Newlands Spring, which is low in dissolved minerals – adjust based on your water profile). Measurements are for 20 litres of water. Calcium chloride 4g Gypsum 3g Magnesium sulphate 2g Sodium bicarbonate 2g ................................................................................................. Mash ingredients 2kg Maris Otter 1kg Munich (25 EBC) 500g rolled oats 500g chit barley 500g oat malt 200g biscuit 200g Crystal (150 EBC) 200g Cara Ambra (45 EBC) 150g roasted barley ................................................................................................. Boil ingredients 10g Magnum [12% AA] @ 60 min 20g East Kent Goldings [5% AA] @ 15 min 20g Fuggles [5% AA] @ 15 min 1 teaspoon of Irish moss @ 15 min 10g East Kent Goldings [5% AA] @ 5 min 10g Fuggles [5% AA] @ 5 min ................................................................................................. Ferment ingredients 1 pkg – Fermentis SafLager W-34/70 Brewer tips Mash in at 68°C for 60 minutes. Mash out at 78°C. Ferment at 12°C for two weeks, then raise to 18°C by steps of 2-3°C per day, then hold at 18°C for two days before cold crashing and bottling. If this sounds like a bit of a performance, I’ve had good results by just fermenting at 12°C for three weeks. Carbonate to 2.0 volumes of CO 2 with dextrose. Leave the bottles at about 16 – 20°C to carbonate, then lager the bottles at 2°C for at least four weeks. If you want to speed things up, or don’t have temperature control, then ferment with US05 or BRY-97 for two weeks at about 20°C instead. The East Kent Goldings and Fuggles are essential, but Magnum can be replaced by any high AA bittering hop – Southern Star is a good choice. For a local twist, reduce the roasted barley in the grain bill to 50g and steep 250g good-quality rooibos after flame out, when the wort temperature has dropped to 80°C, for 10 minutes. OT: Describe your system in a sentence. ER: I have a reasonably basic setup – two gas burners, two 30L stainless steel pots, a good old converted cooler box mash tun, and some 20L bucket fermenters, along with a 30L conical and a converted chest freezer with a thermostat for temperature control. OT: Do you have any brew day quirks or traditions? ER: Definitely always a beer in hand – I brew regularly on a two or three week rotation, so brew day is also the day I get to crack open and sample the previous batch, which increases the enjoyment no end! I like to cap off brew day with a braai or a potjie as well – nothing complements a cold beer better. OT: What would be your ultimate clone? ER: A UK beer called Bishop’s Finger – a strong Kent ale. It might just be the nostalgia, but it was the first beer I really enjoyed, and I’ve never quite managed to nail it in a homebrew. I’ll get it right on the next batch… OT: What is your main homebrewing goal? ER: I’d love to brew a 100% homemade beer one day – I’m talking growing the barley and other grains and hops myself, and isolating an interesting strain of wild yeast. I’m also keen to start kegging – bottles are all very well, but there is something magical about having your own homebrew on tap. This is a malt-forward take on an Irish red ale, but fermented like a lager for a crisp, smooth texture and neutral yeast flavour. Some might call it a dunkel, but I call it delicious! 48 | Spring 2022 | ontapmag.co.za

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