OnTap Magazine

RECIPE FORMULATION Now that we've covered the basics of brewing with fruit, one more item remains to be discussed: the base style of beer to pair with your fruit. Here, there really are no limits save good old-fashioned common sense. What's the point of using fruit if you're going to be covering up the flavour with tons of dark malts and intensely bitter hops? When brewing fruit beers, it makes sense to start with a relatively light beer style as your base, such as wheat beers, blonde ales, and the like. Apart from a light malt bill and subtle hop schedule, you may want to spend some time thinking about the final product and what you're trying to achieve. For instance, what kind of fruit flavours might pair well with the somewhat spicy, estery profile of a wheat beer? How about the more tropical notes of a blonde ale? Put some thought into it and you won't be disappointed. RECIPE RUBY GRAPEFRUIT BLONDE ALE Nuts & bolts Batch size: 19 Litres Target OG: 1.045 Target FG: 1.007 –1.011 Target IBUs: 25 Target ABV: 4.4 –4.9% .................................................................................... Mash ingredients 1.6kg Pale malt 1.6kg Pilsner malt 800g Vienna malt .................................................................................... Boil ingredients 25g Cascade [5.5% AA] @ 60 minutes 5g Irish Moss @ 15 minutes 28g Cascade [5.5% AA] @ 10 minutes .................................................................................... Yeast Use an English ale yeast such as Safale SO4. .................................................................................... Method Using the BIAB method, heat 28 litres of water to a strike temperature of 70°C for a final mash temperature of 67°C. Mash out at 74°C before starting the boil. Prepare 3kgs of grapefruit (pulp only, not the skin) as per the steps above and add it to your fermenter once primary fermentation has been completed. Add an additional week or two for the fruit flavours to fully blend in with the beer. Also, add a teaspoon of pectin enzyme to the fruit pulp before adding to your fermenter if available. This will maximise juice and reduce the fruit haze which is common in styles of this kind. This beer is best served kegged, but if you bottle it, reduce the amount of sugar you would normally add for bottle fermentation. In this case, I'd recommend only adding around 45g of dextrose to the batch before bottling. Here's an example of a pretty simple, yet very interesting fruit beer using the American blonde ale style as a base. Note that grapefruit-like hops are added to complement the existing fruit flavours of the ale. 46 | Spring 2022 | ontapmag.co.za

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